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20130201
20130228
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> pporalso comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it looked like a scene from a movie, but it was all too real. a meteor came crashing down to earth today, triggered a fireball over russia, and sent people running for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> rorter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show
for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it looked like a scene from a movie, but it was all too real. a meteor came crashing down to earth today, triggered a fireball over russia, and sent people running for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> reporter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show until it suddenly explodes 30 miles above the earth. the city of chelyabinsk was unlucky to be beneath the meteorites flight path and was showered with debris dropping from the sky. thousands of windows were smashed, shocked workers evacuated their offices. this school class is about to be interrupted by the shock wave. here the windows come crashing in, and a national judo squad runs for cover. c
woodruff. tonight begins a weeklong focus on guns here on pbs, "after newtown." on the newshour this evening, we look at political and other developments since the december tragedy and zero in on the gun debate in colorado. >> in the divisive atmosphere of the gun debate, both sides, at the federal and state level, say they know the coming months won't be easy. but they will be critical. >> ifill: then, we take up the arguments for and against the proposed construction of the keystone pipeline, as environmental activists mounted a protest this weekend. >> woodurff: ray suarez updates the hugo chavez story, after the president's surprise return to venezuela following more than two months of cancer treatment in cuba. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks with filmmaker kirby dick about his oscar-nominated documentary "the invible war," detailing the high rate of sexual assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape i
>> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to reverberate from coast to coast. >> now! ifill: as gun-control activists push for stricter laws. and gun owners chafe against the prospect of new regulation, crossing for... causing for now an increase in sale in firearms and attendance at gun shows. that dpebt is now spre
. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: with just a week left before automatic spending cuts are set to begin, the obama administration stepped up pressure on republicans in congress today. the latest warnings came over the potential impact that furloughs would have on air trav, starng in apl. transportation secretary ray lahood said travelers could face new delays of 90 minutes at major airports in chicago, new york and san francisco. more than 100 air control towers at smaller airports could be closed, lahood said. airlines likely would cancel flights. and c
to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighborhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ (laughing) - hi, neighbor! we are in the vegetable garden at school. - hello, neighbor. come on, daniel, let's go pick some veggies! - vegetables! have you ever picked vegetables? i haven't. so i'm excited. here i come! look at our garden! what vegetables do you like? i like tomatoes! i can't belie
on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by:
, and welcome to this "pbs newshour" special coverage of president obama's "state of the union" address. we want you to know this program is also being livestreamed on our home page on the web. in just a few moments, the president will spell out his policy agenda for the start of his second term. he is expected tonight to focus mainly on jobs and the economy, and to highlight other domestic priorities including gun control and immigration reform, but also to touch on international challenges. here with me, as they will be throughout our coverage tonight, are syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. mark, what is different about a state of the union when it's the first one of a second term? >> you don't have that many more to look forward to? the sand is running out of the glass. this is probably the best shot that most presidents have in their second term is that first year-and-a-half before you get into congressional elections and the lame duckness really sets in. the race to succeed him begins while he's just sitting there. so this is important. this is th
of -- lot of news about this issue. in january, pbs's "nov a" had a documentary called "rise of the drones," and last week's "time" magazine cover carried the same title, and, of course, the administration's use of drones for targeting terrorists to con cronet our war on terrorism has come to be a central issue in the confirmation hearing of the proposed cia directer, the nominee, john brennan. however, privacy issues and military applications of uas beyond the scope of this hearing. i use the term "unmanned aircraft systems" or usa instead of uas or drones because it is a more complete term. uas are complex systems made up of not just aircraft, but as well as supporting ground, air, and communications infrastructure. uas comes in a variety of shapes and sizes and carries out a wide range of missions. aviation has come a long way in a relatively short period of time thanks to american innovation and i think newty. the list of pioneers in aviation and aerospace is very long. you may not know the details of the achievement, but i'm shore you know names like cesna, james mcdonald and donald d
're learning more about the troubled background of adam lanza. a new investigation by pbs finds that lanza was diagnosed with a sensory disorder, was very shy and liked being touched only by his mother. as for the exposure to guns, friends say lanza's mother nancy loved shooting because it helped her bond with her son. >> extraordinary reporting. this is kind of one of the summary graphs of the story, what emerges in this exploration of a still unfolding story is a portrait of a mother apparently devoted but perhaps misguided, struggling to find a place for her son in society. and a boy exceptionally smart in some areas, profoundly deficient in others, who never found a place in the world. >> it's just so sad because of the outcome of this. you think when you look at what happened in their life, you think if she had just made a different decision somewhere along the way, this could have been avoided. and everybody points to the guns, and that being the wrong decision that she made. but perhaps it's not the guns. maybe it's the type of help she got for her son and it wasn't adequate enough.
help society of "frontline," the pbs program that many of us watch and respect, detailed one woman's story in great detail. but that wasn't an isolated incident. the national prison rape elimination commission, created by congress, has said -- quote -- "as a group, immigration detainees are especially vulnerable to sexual abuse and its effects while detained. the prison rape elimination act of 2003, known as prea, was designed to eliminate sexual abuse of those in custody. it was bipartisan, championed by the late senator ted kennedy and senator sessions of alabama and i cosponsored it. prea required promulgation of national standards to prevent, detect and respond to prison rape in america. there have been questions raised about whether those standards would apply to immigration detainees. and as i've said before, when we drafted and passed prea, it was our intent it would apply to all in federal detention, including immigration detainees. i was pleased when president obama issued a memo clarifying that prea applies to all federal confinement facilities and directing agencies to a
're looking around in the 5% range here pb that will be healthy, 5% to 10%. >> how about you, rich? do you agree or do you have a different number? >> i think we're getting close to full value. earnings are coming in better than expected. two-thirds of companies reported sales. and i don't think this is the 2000 period where everybody is talking about stocks, joe. if we get past the sequester issues with sdwb either with a little bit of a pullback, not the 5% to 10% that the other guest is looking for, the markets are going to have to work higher. there's no other place to put your money right now. the 2% ten-year note doesn't have the competition when the s&p is yielding 2%. so we're still very constructive. and if earnings continue to come in better, we're going to have to raise our target. even though we may be a value in the short run, i still think stocks are the place to be and it's not a frothy market at all. >> because it's hard to get a return anywhere else. but, rich, what is your viewpoint on gdp this year? >> we're at roughly between 1.5% and 2%. >> and you don't think the mark
public service announcements featuring big bird set to run on several pbs stations next week. >> no matter what your age, it's important to get your body moving every single day to help keep you healthy. >> look, mrs. obama, i'm getting moving right now by jogging. >> joining me now for more on this, is leah goldman with "marie claire" magazine. >> we've seen the first lady enlist rachael ray to dr. oz and how would you rate the success of it? >> it's been a successful platform for the first lady, impressively so, i would say. she's seen some really significant results, actually, and typically you see first lady adopt these platforms and they go on the road with them and they do appearances for them, and we've actually seen some effects of this tour. for example, she's going out to mississippi, and since she started this let's move campaign, mississippi has seen a 13% drop of childhood obesity rate and that is the heaviest state in the nation so that's pretty impressive. >> let's look at poll numbers on the first lady. a poll taken two months ago shows that 73% of americans a
he dances. >> gretchen: pbs ordered a four-week run with a movie set to premiere in the fall and air after "conan." will he have the baby? will the baby be part of his act? >> steve: that's what people love. looks like it will be him. >> brian: he'll be broadcasting in cable. meanwhile, the tooth fairy getting more nervous by the day. new going rate, generous, going right for baby teeth, it's not going to be easy. >> steve: and the president has been warning americans of the sequester for several scary weeks. >> a lot of people may not notice the full impact of the sequester, but this is going to be a big hit on the economy. >> steve: i tell you what, the guy who actually invented the sequester with some help from his colleagues on capitol hill say the president not being completely truthful. former senator phil gramm coming up next [ male announcer ] why is kellogg's crunchy nut so delicious? because every flake is double-toasted... splashed with sweet honey... and covered in rich double-roasted peanuts. mmm. [ hero ] yummy. [ male announcer ] kellogg's crunchy nut. it's super delic
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)